Apple’s Mac Computers Are Not As Safe As We Thought

Photo Credit: Morguefile.com

Photo Credit: Morguefile.com

If you’re one of those huge Apple fans that swear by their Mac computers, we have some bad news for you.

You know how Macs are supposed to be safer than PCs and more resistant to hacking? Well, apparently, that is not true!

We understand if you’re upset or in denial…this is a big pill to swallow. We’ll try to tell you what we know, but more will be revealed next week at the Black Hat security conference Las Vegas.

So, researchers who specialize in computer security and malware have found out that five of the six already known vulnerabilities in computers like Samsung, Lenovo, and Dell also apply to Macs.

Plus, if that wasn’t scary enough, further reports indicate that, so far, Apple has only patched up one or two of these problem spots!

That’s not too reassuring, right?

Another disconcerting part of these security researchers’ jobs is to create bugs that take advantage of the vulnerabilities, so that technology companies like Apple can try and find solutions.

Now, we’d like to introduce Thunderstrike 2.

Thunderstrike 2 is, what technology buffs like to call, a firmworm. This just means that it is a bug that infects the firmware of a computer.

If that still doesn’t mean much to you, think of it this way: This worm will infect your computer on a very deep level that is usually out of reach for most anti-virus programs. So if your anti-virus scanner examines your computer for viruses, it probably won’t detect a firmworm.

This kind of worm can even dodge a whole system reboot, which means that if your firmware gets infected, you’re probably going to have to get a new computer.

Thunderstrike 2 can be transmitted from one computer to another by technology and computer accessories that are as simple as an Ethernet adaptor!

Xeno Kovah, one of the researchers involved in the creation of Thunderstrike 2, told Wired on Tuesday, “People are unaware that these small cheap devices can actually infect their firmware… if people don’t have awareness that attacks can be happening at this level then they’re going to have their guard down and an attack will be able to completely subvert their system.”

So, Mac users, you should try and be more aware of your hardware vendors!

In fact, according to Kovah, many of these vendors are going to need to improve their services and give consumers “the ability to easily read their machine’s firmware to determine if it has changed since installation.”

Even though that would be helpful, maybe we should just switch over to Lenovo… that seems less complicated.

How about you, Apple fans, are you reconsidering your alliance?

 

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